Spend Vacations In The Best Quality Living Apartments

Spend Vacations In The Best Quality Living Apartments

Have you ever been to Dallas? If you haven’t been here and are planning to spend your vacations here, it is surely going to prove a great choice to have a great time here. You can find many residential spots available in this beautiful city and amongst all the living units, dallas apartments are worth living in because of so much excitement it provides people with. You will definitely find them worth the money you are paying for it. The living standards here are really high and it will surely convince you to live here forever. You can find so many features which are attractive ones available here in the apartments and some of them will be discussed here.

Continue reading →

Rescue workers search lake for girl who escaped West Dallas juvenile facility

Rescue workers search lake for girl who escaped West Dallas juvenile facility

Dallas Fire-Rescue workers have been dispatched to search a lake for a girl who escaped from a juvenile holding center in West Dallas on Sunday.

Two girls walked away from the Marzelle Hill Transition Center. One is in custody, but officers believe the other one jumped into a nearby lake, according to Dallas police.

Police didn’t identify the lake that rescue workers are searching.

Marzelle Hill is at 2600 Lone Star Drive and is run by Dallas County.

Source Article

Dallas Apartments for Rent

Dallas Apartments for Rent

This North Texas boomtown keeps its eye on the future while celebrating a rich heritage.
Airport Affordable Shopping Parks Aquarium Historic College Public Transportation Rail Service

It’s one of the largest cities in America, combining urban sophistication with an incomparable Texan personality. 1.3 million people call Dallas home, representing every walk of life imaginable; as a result, the city is a completely unique blend of cultures, styles, and flavors. Living in Dallas puts you right in the thick of it all, with endless options to customize your experience. Corporate professionals seeking to avoid a commute may want to look for condos in downtown Dallas, which enables many folks the freedom to walk to work. If cultural stimulation is your thing, consider settling down in an apartment near the Dallas Arts District, home to the Nasher Sculpture Center, the Dallas Museum of Art, the Winspear Opera House, and so much more. And for the more creative types, folks in places like Old East Dallas and North Oak Cliff foster artistic pursuits among neighbors. For your off-hours, Dallas offers some of the most diverse nightlife in Texas, often just a short ride or walk from residential apartment areas. From laid back lounges to thumping night clubs, you should be able to find the ideal night spot for your weekend R&R.

Explore the City

The Dallas skyline on a cloudy afternoon

Southfork Ranch in Dallas

The Pumpkin House at the Dallas Arboretum

Living in Dallas
Trammell Crow Park is a massive green space following the banks of the Trinity River as it flows past Downtown. The Dallas Arboretum and Botanical Garden features an exquisite collection of lush flowers and greenery on the shores of White Rock Lake. Smaller parks like Uptown’s Reverchon Park are scattered among the city’s countless neighborhoods, providing attractive and relaxing recreation grounds for everyone. As one of America’s largest cities, the rental market in Dallas is incredibly diverse and covers a huge range of prices. Affordable apartments are available in several styles and sizes, and it’s not terribly difficult to find rates under $600 per month. On the other end of the spectrum, upscale houses and swanky properties go for over $10,000 monthly. Average rental rates for a one-bedroom apartment hover around $1,000 and just under $1,500 for a two-bedroom unit, making it one of the more affordable large cities in the country. Transportation While Dallas sometimes gets a bad reputation for traffic, just about every neighborhood in town is extremely walkable. If you decide to make your nest a bit outside the urban core, don’t worry about being cut off from the city. There is no shortage of public transport in the area, and downtown is only a 20 minute DART light rail ride away from places like Richland. Also, McKinney Avenue Uptown is serviced by the McKinney Avenue Transit Authority streetcars, which are free to the public.
No matter where your Dallas apartment is located, you will have no trouble finding excellent shopping options close to home. The West Village in particular finds its residents coexisting with all sorts of business, including charming boutiques and upscale shops. In north Dallas, just off the toll way, you can visit the Dallas Galleria, which houses over 200 shops, boutiques, and restaurants. Virtually all of your shopping needs can be met here, just 10 minutes away from your Highland Terrace apartment in Richardson. Thanks to its vibrant collective of cultural influences, Dallas is packed full of incredible dining options. Whether you’re craving exquisite European cuisine, unpretentious diners, or the ever-popular Tex-Mex and barbecue, there will be plenty to satisfy your appetite, often only minutes from your Dallas apartment. If you’re looking for a food truck, head over to the Truck Yard on Lower Greenville. Lovingly referred to by locals as an "adult playground" with a tree house bar and at least three food trucks parked in the 15 thousand square feet of shady dining area, the Truck Yard is a one-of-a-kind Dallas experience. The trucks rotate daily, so check their schedule to see if something yummy catches your eye. The area now known as Dallas was part of Spain’s vast colonial empire for centuries before the city was officially founded in 1841. The late 19th century brought enormous growth in both industry and population, and the young city rapidly developed into a modern metropolis with railroad access, electricity, and the first zoo in Texas (which is still in operation today). Aviation became a major industry starting during the First World War, with Love Field being established as a pilot training facility. Oil buoyed the city’s economy during the Great Depression, and helped turn Dallas into a financial powerhouse. A building boom starting in the late 1970s transformed the historic community into the city we see today, although many grand historic buildings have been preserved to honor Dallas’ rich legacy.
NearbyThis North Texas boomtown keeps its eye on the future while celebrating a rich heritage.
Airport Affordable Shopping Parks Aquarium Historic College Public Transportation Rail Service

It’s one of the largest cities in America, combining urban sophistication with an incomparable Texan personality. 1.3 million people call Dallas home, representing every walk of life imaginable; as a result, the city is a completely unique blend of cultures, styles, and flavors. Living in Dallas puts you right in the thick of it all, with endless options to customize your experience. Corporate professionals seeking to avoid a commute may want to look for condos in downtown Dallas, which enables many folks the freedom to walk to work. If cultural stimulation is your thing, consider settling down in an apartment near the Dallas Arts District, home to the Nasher Sculpture Center, the Dallas Museum of Art, the Winspear Opera House, and so much more. And for the more creative types, folks in places like Old East Dallas and North Oak Cliff foster artistic pursuits among neighbors. For your off-hours, Dallas offers some of the most diverse nightlife in Texas, often just a short ride or walk from residential apartment areas. From laid back lounges to thumping night clubs, you should be able to find the ideal night spot for your weekend R&R.

Explore the City

The Dallas skyline on a cloudy afternoon

Southfork Ranch in Dallas

The Pumpkin House at the Dallas Arboretum

Living in Dallas
Trammell Crow Park is a massive green space following the banks of the Trinity River as it flows past Downtown. The Dallas Arboretum and Botanical Garden features an exquisite collection of lush flowers and greenery on the shores of White Rock Lake. Smaller parks like Uptown’s Reverchon Park are scattered among the city’s countless neighborhoods, providing attractive and relaxing recreation grounds for everyone. As one of America’s largest cities, the rental market in Dallas is incredibly diverse and covers a huge range of prices. Affordable apartments are available in several styles and sizes, and it’s not terribly difficult to find rates under $600 per month. On the other end of the spectrum, upscale houses and swanky properties go for over $10,000 monthly. Average rental rates for a one-bedroom apartment hover around $1,000 and just under $1,500 for a two-bedroom unit, making it one of the more affordable large cities in the country. Transportation While Dallas sometimes gets a bad reputation for traffic, just about every neighborhood in town is extremely walkable. If you decide to make your nest a bit outside the urban core, don’t worry about being cut off from the city. There is no shortage of public transport in the area, and downtown is only a 20 minute DART light rail ride away from places like Richland. Also, McKinney Avenue Uptown is serviced by the McKinney Avenue Transit Authority streetcars, which are free to the public.
No matter where your Dallas apartment is located, you will have no trouble finding excellent shopping options close to home. The West Village in particular finds its residents coexisting with all sorts of business, including charming boutiques and upscale shops. In north Dallas, just off the toll way, you can visit the Dallas Galleria, which houses over 200 shops, boutiques, and restaurants. Virtually all of your shopping needs can be met here, just 10 minutes away from your Highland Terrace apartment in Richardson. Thanks to its vibrant collective of cultural influences, Dallas is packed full of incredible dining options. Whether you’re craving exquisite European cuisine, unpretentious diners, or the ever-popular Tex-Mex and barbecue, there will be plenty to satisfy your appetite, often only minutes from your Dallas apartment. If you’re looking for a food truck, head over to the Truck Yard on Lower Greenville. Lovingly referred to by locals as an "adult playground" with a tree house bar and at least three food trucks parked in the 15 thousand square feet of shady dining area, the Truck Yard is a one-of-a-kind Dallas experience. The trucks rotate daily, so check their schedule to see if something yummy catches your eye. The area now known as Dallas was part of Spain’s vast colonial empire for centuries before the city was officially founded in 1841. The late 19th century brought enormous growth in both industry and population, and the young city rapidly developed into a modern metropolis with railroad access, electricity, and the first zoo in Texas (which is still in operation today). Aviation became a major industry starting during the First World War, with Love Field being established as a pilot training facility. Oil buoyed the city’s economy during the Great Depression, and helped turn Dallas into a financial powerhouse. A building boom starting in the late 1970s transformed the historic community into the city we see today, although many grand historic buildings have been preserved to honor Dallas’ rich legacy.
Nearby

Source Article

Troubled South Dallas apartment complex now in hands of receiver

Troubled South Dallas apartment complex now in hands of receiver

A South Dallas apartment owner who blew sarcastic kisses at angry tenants on his way out of a courtroom this week has been replaced by a receiver appointed to oversee the complex by a Dallas County judge. It’s unclear what that means for residents beleaguered by code violations, health concerns and high crime.

Late Thursday evening, Dallas County Judge Dale Tillery appointed a Dallas businessman to run and repair a treacherous South Dallas apartment complex at the center of a 2-year-old lawsuit filed by the city of Dallas. That means, if nothing else, that for the next 360 days, the 14-unit complex at 3006 Holmes St. off Martin Luther King Jr. Boulevard will be out of the hands of Jaymeson Joseph Haynes, the 35-year-old owner accused of threatening tenants and ignoring legal orders that required him to repair and secure a dangerous building by the end of April.

A burned-out Toyota 4Runner sat in the parking lot at 3006 Holmes St. days after someone set it ablaze.

Tillery appointed as receiver Albert Black III — better known as Tre, son of well-known Dallas entrepreneur Albert Black Jr.

According to the judge’s order, Black will be tasked with taking control of the property, collecting rents and making any repairs necessary "to bring the property into compliance with the minimum standards" spelled out in the city code.

The order says Black is to be paid $250 an hour every 90 days. That money that will come out of rent he collects from tenants, who pay around $800 a month to live in a complex where drug dealers and dope-seekers urinate and defecate next to broken mailboxes, toilets flush wastewater into bathtubs and apartments are missing such essentials as smoke detectors, stoves, refrigerators and light fixtures.

He’s also supposed to use that same rent money to make much-needed repairs. If his receipts total more than $10,000, he is supposed to submit receipts to the city and Haynes and seek Tillery’s approval.

When reached by phone Friday afternoon at the offices of On-Target Supplies & Logistics, Ltd., the company founded by his father, Tre Black said he "just found out" about the judge’s order. He also added, via email, that since he was just appointed, "I do not have any comment on the case at the time."

Black said he didn’t know why he’d been appointed as the receiver. But according to legal documents filed in 2014 in an unrelated bankruptcy in which a federal judge appointed him receiver for a company to which he had no connection, Black said "it is common for court-appointed receivers to be drawn from a list or panel maintained by the state court."

Melissa Miles, the city attorney who has been investigating Haynes and 3006 Holmes for more than three years and prosecuting its owner for more than two, said she could not comment.

Tenants at 3006 Holmes St. can’t get their mail because boxes are missing doors or are not locked.

According to a document dated May 1 and signed by Miles and Ray Galvan Jr., Haynes’ attorney, the apartment owner could have been fined up to $1,000 per day per violation, of which there are hundreds. Miles has said that at a hearing Wednesday that Tillery was supposed to determine the amount Haynes owned based on what he had — or, more appropriately, had not — done at 3006 Holmes.

But the judge did not punish the apartment owner. Instead, he has made the complex the responsibility of Tre Black, who, until Thursday evening, knew nothing about it.

That infuriates Dr. Terry Flowers, headmaster at St. Philip’s School and Community Center, who sat through almost a dozen hearings in the hopes of cleaning up a troubled property that, he says, has helped bring drugs, prostitution and violence into a neighborhood that’s all too familiar with being told it doesn’t deserve justice.

"All people need hope, and when you take away hope that is not in the best interest of civilization," he said. "In this case, it’s penalizing us, not the apartment owner, so people will just throw up their hands and say, ‘Why bother? Why care? Why vote? Why invest?’ It’s a message not just for South Dallas, but all of Dallas. When you hurt people, you hurt people."

Source Article

D-FW’s hot housing market hasn’t seen much condo building

D-FW’s hot housing market hasn’t seen much condo building

North Texas leads the country in apartment construction with more than 50,000 units on the way.

But when it comes to condominiums, not enough is being built to even move the needle.

While other major metros including Atlanta and Denver are seeing a flurry of condo construction, Dallas-Fort Worth hasn’t seen much built in this cycle.

Most of the condos being constructed are in a few high-rise projects so far clustered in the central city. Condo projects are so few and far between that they can get a big response when one pops up.

Developers recently announced plans for a seven-story condo building near Dallas’ White Rock Lake that would have more than 90 units and start in price under $300,000.

"We’ve had so many calls and inquiries on the Drake that we haven’t been able to get to them," said Al Coker, who is marketing the building. "I think the tide is turning.

"There is no new condo inventory to speak of."

Coker said apartment builders have priced up construction sites that could be used for condominiums.

And a flurry of lawsuits on the West Coast regarding construction defects chased off some builders.

While a few deluxe high-rise condo projects have gotten attention in Dallas, the multiple smaller, less expensive developments common in other markets have been absent in North Texas.

"Dallas has never been on par with any of the other top 10 cities in America," Coker said of condo development.

Demand for existing condo units is strong. Through the first four months of the year, real estate agents sold more than 2,000 D-FW condos. Median sales prices are up 15 percent to $212,500.

Two more condo towers are kicking off in Dallas this year. Developer Craig Hall is building a 44-unit condo high-rise in downtown’s Arts District. Units in the 25-story tower on Flora Street will start near $2 million.

In Plano, work will begin this summer on the 24-story, 95-unit Windrose condos as part of the $3 billion Legacy West development. Homes at the Plano tower are priced starting near $650,000.

Developer Harwood International is opening its 33-story Bleu Ciel condominium tower in Dallas’ Uptown area. Those luxury units begin at about $800,000.

The high-rise condos are priced at multiples of what a new single-family home costs in D-FW — a median price of about $350,000.

Paige Shipp of housing analyst MetroStudy thinks it may take developers from outside North Texas to tap into the potential for moderately priced condos.

"It’s not going to come from a builder that’s been building single-family homes in Dallas-Fort Worth," Shipp said. "Our traditional builders will have a hard time trying to crack that."

Shipp said restrictions from local city governments and neighborhood associations may also limit the spread of condo development.

"There is no question there is demand," she said. "I definitely think we will see it, but it’s going to be an education."

Source Article

First look: Downtown Dallas’ historic Statler Hotel apartments are ready

First look: Downtown Dallas’ historic Statler Hotel apartments are ready

They are the first of hundreds of apartment renters who will be moving into the old hotel in the coming months.

The 61-year-old hotel is being converted into more than 200 apartments on the upper floors. The lower seven levels of the building will house a 161-room Hilton hotel, restaurants and retail space.

The smallest apartment in the Statler Residences — about 500 square feet — goes for about $1,400 a month. A penthouse with 2,240 square feet will set you back almost $7,600.

Deric Medina, with management company Pinnacle Living, said the Statler Residences have been sponsoring downtown events and promoting the building on social media.

"We get a lot of people in the downtown area," Medina said. "They’ve seen the building being resurrected."

Along with offering a mid-century modern building, the rent includes a fourth-story pool and lounge deck, a workout room on the ground floor and 24-hour concierge service.

You can get room service meals from the hotel, too.

The rental units all have views of the Main Street Garden park out front or surrounding downtown buildings and streets.

Most of the high-rises in that area of downtown have already been converted to apartments or hotel rooms. Each of the apartments has dark wood modern kitchens with stainless steel appliances. The bathrooms have glass-enclosed showers, quartz countertops and pedestal sinks.

"A lot of people want to come in and see what it looks like," said Pinnacle’s Raquel Rose. "The units still have that ‘Statler’ look."

Rose said the contractors are finishing the apartments from the 18th floor down.

The hotel and public areas occupy the first seven floors of the building. The Hilton Curio Hotel will open this fall, and the entire project should wrap up by the end of the year.

The $175 million redevelopment is a project of Centurion American Development Group. Merriman Anderson/Architects designed the renovation of the building.

Source Article

Decorating Dallas Apartments

Decorating Dallas Apartments

Is your Dallas apartment looking a little shabby? If your apartment is dull, you don’t have to worry. There are a lot of things that you can do to spruce your new place up.

Hit Up Thrift Stores

Do you want to decorate for less? If you’re trying to spend less cash, you should check out some of the thrift stores in Dallas. A lot of these shops carry furniture and home decor. The selection is fantastic, and the prices are incredibly low.

Spruce Up Your Apartment Without Breaking Your Lease

If the terms of your lease are strict, you might be nervous about decorating. Thankfully, there are a lot of ways to decorate that don’t require you to break the rules.

If you can’t paint your walls, decorate them with art! If you can’t nail pictures up on your walls, buy supplies that will allow you to tape or Velcro them instead. You don’t have to break the rules; you can do a lot while coloring within the lines.

Think About The Space That You Have

Dallas is a big city, but it isn’t known for having huge apartments. In fact, some of the apartments here are downright cramped. That’s why you need to use your space in an efficient way.

Before you buy a new piece of furniture, think about how it will work in your space. If a piece will take too much room, you should opt for something else instead.

Spruce Up Your Cheap Furniture

Is your furniture old and cheap? If it is, you can easily spruce it up! Throw pillows, slip covers, and blankets can make a world of difference.

Decorating Dallas apartments is a lot easier than you might think. It’s okay if you don’t have a big decorating budget. Even if you can’t spend much money, you can make your apartment look absolutely spectacular.

West Dallas Residents Struggle to Keep Affordable Housing Amid Change

West Dallas Residents Struggle to Keep Affordable Housing Amid Change

The Margaret Hunt Hill bridge in Dallas, Texas. (Tony Gutierrez / AP Photo) i

For more than a century, West Dallas was treated differently from the rest of Dallas proper. Although it morphed from an industrial community to an urban one with changing demographics, it was always considered poor.

Then in 2012, the big, shiny, white Margaret Hunt Hill Bridge was built, connecting downtown with West Dallas, and with it came change: Fancy shops, restaurants, and high-rise apartments flooded the neighborhood. Now hundreds of residents who have lived in West Dallas for generations can’t afford to stay. The city of Dallas boosted its rental property standards, and landlords say the repairs to the rental houses are too expensive to achieve ahead of the June 3 deadline set for residents to leave their homes.

KERA’s series "One Crisis Away: No Place to Go" explores the changes taking place in West Dallas and documents the lives of people who are trying to figure out where else to go. KERA reporter Courtney Collins, who leads the reporting for the series, talked with residents, the landlord of the rental properties, and the mayor about the rapid gentrification of West Dallas and solutions to the issue.

Source Article

West Dallas push to tackle gentrification, affordable housing issues

West Dallas push to tackle gentrification, affordable housing issues

DALLAS – With all of the new development happening across West Dallas, there are some community stakeholders fighting to keep affordable housing a priority.

It is a fight. It is a fight that has its fair share of challenges between West Dallas and Austin.

There is a lot of momentum in West Dallas, right now. Luxury apartments are going up. A flood of new homes is attracting new neighbors.

“West Dallas is really booming right now,” said James Armstrong, a local pastor and community development advocate.

“A lot of great things are happening. But also a lot of not so great things are happening.”

New development is bringing some deep concerns for longtime neighbors. There are issues involving gentrification.

Armstrong explained, ”With the recent development happening, you have displacement taking place, and people are being forced out of their homes where they’ve been 30, 40, even 50 years.”08

Those concerns have been echoed by State Representative Eric Johnson. He has been listening to community members, and drafted House Bill 2480, a measure that would tackle gentrification and affordable housing.

Neighbors in West Dallas who have heard about HB 2480 say they support the Bill as a tool that would give cities options for families trying to make ends meet near reinvestment zones.

Neighbor Teresa Esparza said, ”There is the concern, the prices will go higher on the taxes and all. That’s something we are trying to keep in our budget.”07

Supporters of HB 2480 say the tool would tackle a few things, including require cities to do housing studies in reinvestment zones, require a certain amount of affordable housing, and address some property tax measures.

Johnson was prepared to defend the Bill during a local and consent agenda on the House floor on Tuesday. However, HB 2480 was pulled from the calendar due to the signatures of five lawmakers. Those signatures were from Rep. Matt Rinaldi, Rep. Jonathan Strickland, Rep. Tony Tinderholt, Rep. Valoree Swanson, and Rep. Matt Shaheen.

“We’ll remember those who stood against West Dallas and also those who did nothing to help when the wolf was at the door,” Rep. Johnson said in a Tweet.

Representative Johnson’s fight to push HB 2480 is not over. The Bill will be up for reconsideration on Friday.

“I’ll leave it up to you to guess who’s behind these members trying to kill this bill,” Johnson said in a social media post.

© 2017 WFAA-TV

Intruder sexually assaults woman in her Dallas apartment, police say

Intruder sexually assaults woman in her Dallas apartment, police say

Police are looking for a man who sexually assaulted a woman in her Dallas apartment Tuesday afternoon.

The incident happened about 3 p.m., when the suspect entered the residence, in the 7200 block of Holly Hill Drive, through an unlocked door.

After demanding property and brandishing a weapon, the suspect assaulted the victim and fled.

The suspect is described as an Asian or Latin male in his mid-20s, about five-foot-four with a medium build and short black hair. He was wearing a white polo-style shirt with a green logo, and baggy khaki pants.

Anyone with information is asked to call Crime Stoppers at 214-373-TIPS (8477).

$100 million Legacy West apartment tower starts construction

$100 million Legacy West apartment tower starts construction

Steve Brown

The first groundbreaking at Plano’s $3 billion Legacy West project was back in 2014 when the 250-acre project kicked off.

Since then there’s been a steady stream of construction starts.

On Thursday, work began on what will be the tallest tower in Plano.

The $100 million, 29-story LVL29 apartment high-rise is being built next door to Liberty Mutual Insurance’s high-rise campus in Legacy West.

The 328-unit, modernistic looking tower will sit just west of the Dallas Tollway between Liberty Mutual and JPMorgan Chase’s new office complex located just south of State Highway 121.

The luxury tower is been in the works for more than a year.

"Reaching the groundbreaking is a big milestone and Legacy West," said Luke Harry, project manager with NE Development. "We are excited to make our mark on Plano and Legacy West."

The apartment tower will be one of the tallest buildings outside of the downtown Dallas area.

Legacy West developer Fehmi Karahan said that 19 years ago when he started developing in Legacy business park, the tallest building in the area was the Electronic Data System headquarters which has about eight floors.

Legacy West developer Fehmi Karahan and Plano mayor Harry LaRosiliere took part in the groundbreaking.

"This is going to be an iconic building," Karahan said at the groundbreaking. "A development of this size and magnitude takes a lot of courage."

The nearby Legacy West Urban Village with shops, apartments and a luxury hotel will open in June.

"Thirty eight months after the groundbreaking for Legacy West to be able to see all this took a lot of coordination," Karahan said.

Plano mayor Harry LaRosiliere has been to a lot of groundbreakings in Legacy West during the last few years.

Offices for Toyota, Liberty Mutual and Chase will all be open later in 2017.

"I call this the year of the big bang," LaRosiliere said. "This area of Legacy West is the center of the universe.

"There’s nothing else going on like Legacy West.

Apartments in the LVL29 tower will start at about $1,600 a month for the smallest unit.